CHEST TRAINING

The 85% Solution

The core principle of my training programs is heavy compound movements. When I say heavy, I mean 85 percent of my one rep max. This means my rep range usually falls somewhere between 5 and 8. The purpose of these heavy reps is to induce myofibrilla hypertrophy, which is a process where actin and myosin contractile protein increase. Sarcoplasmic hypertrophy, on the other hand, occurs where fluids in the muscle cell increase, causing the muscle cell to expand.

Although I occasionally perform higher volume workouts, the majority of my chest training is made up of heavy lifts. I don’t spend much time under a barbell, though. My workouts include dumbbells, cables and my own body used as weight. I also hit it from many different angles.

EXERCISE 1//
(4 sets of 8 reps, rest 2 minutes between sets)

Pro Tip: I start every chest workout with incline dumbbell press because the upper chest is usually the hardest to develop. I want to attack it when I have the most energy to ensure maximum intensity—this equates to maximum growth.

EXERCISE 2//
(4 sets of 8 reps, rest 2 minutes between sets)

Pro Tip: I like to follow incline press with flyes because they target different muscles and really stretch the muscle fibers. This elongation helps to achieve the striations you see on my chest. These lines can be the difference between a good chest and a phenomenal chest.

EXERCISE 3//
(3 sets of 10-12 reps, rest 2 minutes between sets)

Pro Tip: Be extremely careful when you do this lift. Always have a spotter, use moderate weight, and stay in control. It’s called the Guillotine press for a reason!

EXERCISE 4//
(4 sets of 8 reps, rest 2 minutes between sets)

Pro Tip: Contrary to common knowledge, dips actually target the chest muscles, not just the triceps. If you work your chest and triceps on the same day, dips are a perfect exercise.

EXERCISE 5//
(Triset with 3 different angles, 3 sets of 10, 10, 10 reps, rest 2 minutes between sets)

Angle 1: Stand straight up and put one foot in front of the other. The end of the flye movement should end with both hands together at eye level. The emphasis is on the upper chest.

Angle 2: Lean forward and face down toward the ground. Finish the flye movement with both your hands together in line with the middle of your chest. The emphasis here is the mid-chest.

Angle 3: Stand parallel to the cables and end the flye with both hands meeting together at the bottom of the quads. This movement emphasizes the lower and outer chest.

Pro Tip: You probably won’t be able to finish the entire superset with the same weight, so don’t feel bad if you have to use less weight. You may also feel stronger or weaker depending on the angle, so adjust the weight to make your work harder or easier. Remember though, this is a superset, so make sure you make the transitions quickly.

Training triceps

Anatomy Of The Triceps

The Triceps Brachii has three heads which connect the humerus and scapula bones to the forearm bone called the ulna. These three heads are known as the Lateral, Medial, and Long heads.

The lateral head is located on the outward facing side of the humerus. This head is most responsible for the horseshoe shape of the triceps.

The medial head is located towards the midline of the body.

The long head along the bottom side of the humerus and is that largest of the three heads.

Click Image To Enlarge.
Triceps Brachii.
For More Triceps Anatomical Information, Click Here.
The primary function of the tricep is to extend the elbow (straightening the arm). The secondary function of the tricep is fulfilled only by the long head of the muscle, which brings the arm down towards the body (adduction).

RELATED ARTICLE
Insane Tricep Training!
The following routine is meant for putting the strength in the triceps through the roof, but it will definitely add some major ungodly mass to them arms.
[ Click here to learn more. ]

Triceps Exercises

Here are my top 4 favorite tricep exercises that I compiled from other various Bodybuilding.com articles:

Pulley Pushdowns

This basic movement stresses the entire triceps muscle complex, particularly the outer and medial heads. Grip the bar overhand with your index fingers no more than 3-5 inches apart in the middle of the handle. Your feet should be shoulder width apart, about 10-12 inches back from the handle.

Click Image To Enlarge.
Pulley Pushdowns.

Video Guides: Windows Media – Real Player
Fully bend your arms, pressing your upper arms against your torso, where they should stay through the duration of the set. Leaning slightly forward, move your forearms down, slowly straightening your arms. Hold the straight-arm position momentarily, while flexing your triceps intensely. Slowly return to the starting point.

A good variation is the rope handle. You can also do this exercise with an undergrip on the bar and with different width grips.

Lying Barbell Triceps Extensions

These fundamental favorites isolate intense stress on the triceps, particularly the medial and outer heads. Taking a narrow overgrip in the middle of a moderately weighted barbell, lie on your back on an exercise bench. Keep your feet on the sides of the bench to provide balance.

Click Image To Enlarge.
Lying Barbell Triceps Extensions.

Video Guides: Windows Media – MPEG
Extend your arms straight up above your head. With your upper arms remaining motionless throughout the set, bend your elbows allowing the barbell to travel downward in a semicircular arc until it slightly touches your forehead. Reverse the direction of the movement of the bar using only tricep strength to slowly straighten your arms.

There are many effective variations, such as using different grip widths, doing them seated, using an undergrip, or using a decline or incline bench.

One-Dumbbell Triceps Extensions

This movement stresses the entire triceps muscle complex, particularly the inner and medial heads. Take the dumbbell and grip it so that your palms are facing the inner-top plate and the dumbbell is hanging straight down (perpendicular to the gym floor). To keep the weight from slipping, encircle your thumbs around the dumbbell handle.

Click Image To Enlarge.
One-Dumbbell Triceps Extensions.

Video Guides: Windows Media – MPEG
Lift the dumbbell straight up above your head. This is the start position. Lower the weight slowly behind your head until your arms are full bent. Without bouncing in the bottom position, slowly raise the dumbbell back to the start position.

You can increase the strictness of this movement by sitting at the end of a flat exercise bench, or on the floor with your back braced against the bench.

Standing Barbell Triceps Extensions

This is a fundamental triceps exercise, stressing the inner and medial heads of the triceps muscle complex. Take a narrow overgrip in the middle of a moderately-weighted barbell. With feet about shoulder width apart, stand erect, and extend your arms straight up from your shoulders.

Click Image To Enlarge.
Standing Barbell Triceps Extensions.

Video Guides: Windows Media – Real Player
Keep your upper arms in the same position, while you lower the weight slowly behind your head until your arms are completely bent. Without bouncing in the bottom position, slowly raise the bar back to the start position.

You can vary the width of your grip on the bar or use an undergrip to isolate different parts of the muscle. You can also do these seated to isolate your legs from movement, making the exercise somewhat stricter.

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